MBAnalysis Blog: Yale SOM – Full of Surprises

As Yale School of Management becomes one of the first business school to release its application dates, it is clear that Yale has now cemented its place among the top ten-ish business schools. But it has not always been this way.

In fact, it took about 20 years for the Yale School of Organization and Management – with its focus on nonprofit and government work and its unique Masters in Public and Private Management (MPPM) degree – to fully embrace the for-profit sector and begin granting a MBA degrees in 1999.

Still, even today, Yale is a school that encourage its students to go into nonprofits or the government upon graduation. Though only about 8% of students actually do, this far outstrips the approximately 1% of students at other schools who make this choice.

To facilitate this process, Yale has a loan forgiveness program whereby some portion of your student loans will be wiped out if you start working in the public or nonprofit sectors. The net result is a school with a slightly different buzz than other places.

Adding to this different culture is another sort of buzz: the buzz of little worker bees who are ready to conquer the world though they just graduated college. Billed as the Silver Scholars program, it allows students right out of undergraduate to begin their business school education.

This means that Silver Scholars spend one year at Yale SOM learning basic business skills, the next year in the working world doing an extended internship, and then back at the business school for a third year to take electives and make plans for that post-graduation job. For the right go-getter, who knows exactly what they want to do for the rest of their lives, this could be the program that is right for them.

For most of you who have already spent a number of years out in the working world, I turn your attention to this year’s essay prompt (same as last year) which asks you to “describe the biggest commitment you have ever made (500 words).”

With Yale though, no need to be constrained in your answer; they respect any commitment that is dear to you be it in the for-profit, nonprofit, government world or in some other interesting place. Just help them understand what this commitment is an authentic way.

Related Post

[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet_bg']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']
[data-image-id='gourmet']